Erika Lassen—a Brigham Young University graduate, stay-at-home mother of five, Texas native, Virginia resident and self-described conservative—objects to a Calvin Klein ad in New York. Here is a link to the maybe just "sexy," maybe "borderline pornographic" but definitely "attention-whoring" ad. But a WARNING before you click! Lassen writes: 

I am grateful for freedom of speech. It is because of this right that I am able to publicly disagree with President Barack Obama. However, should there be a line drawn that freedom of speech should not cross? We are free as long as our freedoms do not infringe upon the civil liberties of others, correct?

An interesting thing happens when pornography is viewed. Like a leech, it clings to the brain. The image pops up in our minds at rather random, unexpected times. Even if we don't want to ever see the image again, it sneaks up on you. I do not want the Calvin Klein image in my mind and when I saw it on the front page of Fox I immediately wished I had not, but I did see it. And now I will need to force the image out whenever it springs on me.

Calvin Klein's freedom of speech has effectively infringed upon my freedoms.

Ok. Hmm. I have seen this ad and have never thought about it once. It went in one eyeball and out the other, never springing on my brain again at all. This may be because I don't have lesbian or foursome fantasies, or am totally mature, or jaded and conscience-calcified from living in the city or all of the above. 

Even if it did bother me the bottom line is—I decided to live in New York, so I deal with it. Lassen has chosen to live in Virginia, so why does she care? 

Would my perspective change if I was a mother of one or five? If I choose to raise my kids in New York, I would just have to accept that their childhood will include, along with basketball and hopscotch, walks past sex shops and homeless men screaming the f-word. At the moment, New York is also pasted with pictures of Lady Gaga barely covered in pink bubbles and Nurse Jackie making an obscene gesture with a syringe. If I complained about everything I wouldn't choose to put on my own wall I would just get exhausted and move to … Utah perhaps.

In other words, we actually have choices. The choice to live in a more permissive culture or a more conservative culture, and presumably the moral choice to choose not to think about things we don't want to think about. 

I guess this means I shouldn't mock BYU for not allowing YouTube. But seriously, it might help.

 
About The Author

Alisa Harris

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