My latest at The Huffington Post:

I get Rick Santorum’s beef with higher education. When he calls President Obama a snob for wanting to make higher education a possibility for all people or when he rants about the liberal professors who try indoctrinate students, I get where he’s coming from. I went to a Christian college for something very close to this reason.

Further, New York Times writers like Frank Bruni and Dick Cavett are right to draw a connection between Santorum’s remarks on higher education and his own decision to home school his children. I wasn’t home schooled, but I had the next closest thing: a private education at a tiny Christian school at which my parents, and the parents of many of my friends, served as the teachers. It was like a perpetual home school tupperware party.

The decision by my parents to give me this kind of education was part practical — the public schools in the city I grew up in were subpar — but also part reflective of Santorum’s desire to protect children from the corrupting influence of the secular world. So, too, was my decision to forego applying to any of Boston’s esteemed colleges and universities in favor of Gordon College, the small Christian liberal arts school 45 minutes north of the city that I ultimately attended.

And, you know, it kind of worked. Today, at 30 years old, I am still a Christian. My childhood and even teen and college years were relatively free of any of the kind of trouble that many of my peers find themselves in.

Although, come to think of it, Mr. Santorum might not see me as a success story of his educational philosophy after all.

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Jonathan D. Fitzgerald

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